12 Former Patients Sue New Mexico Psychiatrist For Malpractice, Sexual Misconduct

Twelve former patients of a New Mexico psychiatrist have sued him and the hospital where he practiced for psychiatric malpractice and sexual misconduct. The New Mexico medical malpractice complaint was filed on October 4, 2017 and alleges that each of the plaintiffs were victims of sexual abuse and assault committed by the defendant psychiatrist during treatment.

The New Mexico medical malpractice lawsuit alleges that the defendant psychiatrist leveraged his position of trust and specialized knowledge to groom his patient victims and force them into sexually abusive situations in multiple ways, including identifying survivors of past sexual abuse and forcing them to recount their histories in graphic and inappropriate detail, under the guise of providing legitimate treatment; convincing patients that sexual acts would relieve stress or anxiety; withholding needed medications or services such as physician letters for custody hearings unless sexual acts were performed; adding and subtracting prescription medications in an apparent attempt to destabilize victims and increase their vulnerability to abuse; and, he allegedly emphasized and preyed upon patients’ feelings of isolation, depression, anxiety, and belief that their doctor’s word would be taken above theirs if they attempted to report abuse.

One of the plaintiffs alleged in the New Mexico medical malpractice complaint that while she was an inpatient at the defendant hospital, the defendant psychiatrist was assigned to her to provide psychiatric care. The plaintiff alleges that upon learning that the plaintiff had been a victim of prior sexual violence, the defendant psychiatrist would steer their conversations to sexual matters and require the plaintiff to describe in graphic detail her past sexual abuse and sexual encounters. The plaintiff alleges that the defendant psychiatrist told her that he would provide favorable reports in support of her obtaining custody of her children if she would perform sexual acts on him, which resulted in the plaintiff performing oral sex on him on multiple occasions and the defendant digitally penetrating her vagina and fondling her breasts.

This plaintiff further alleges that the defendant psychiatrist threatened to transfer her to an “undesirable location” for psychiatric treatment, that the defendant knew the plaintiff feared, if she failed to answer his questions. The plaintiff alleges that the defendant psychiatrist told her that her roommate in the hospital was “hot” and that the plaintiff should perform sexual acts on the roommate while the roommate was sedated. The plaintiff alleges that the defendant psychiatrist changed her medication regime and continually adjusted her medications that caused an increase in her symptoms and side effects.

Another plaintiff alleges in the New Mexico medical malpractice complaint that she was referred to the defendant psychiatrist by her doctor. The defendant psychiatrist allegedly would steer their conversations to sexual matters and told her that her current problems were because of pent-up sexual energy that he could help her with. The plaintiff alleges that she was required to perform oral sex on the defendant psychiatrist and that he told her that he would withhold her prescription medications unless she complied with his demands.

Each of the twelve plaintiffs allege in their portion of the New Mexico medical malpractice complaint that the defendant psychiatrist would steer their conversations to sexual matters and require them to describe in graphic detail their past sexual abuse, sexual encounters, and sexual fantasies.

The plaintiffs also allege in their New Mexico medical malpractice complaint that the defendants have failed to provide them with copies of their requested medical records, and that the defendants have contacted other alleged victims of the defendant psychiatrist in an attempt to convince them not to take legal action action against the defendants or testify against them, and the defendants have improperly accessed the plaintiffs’ medical records in order to do so.

The plaintiffs’ 34-page, 13-count New Mexico medical malpractice complaint seeks compensatory damages, treble damages and punitive damages from the defendants.

Source

If you or a family member suffered harm as a result of psychiatrist malpractice in New Mexico or in another U.S. state, you should promptly find a New Mexico medical malpractice lawyer, or a medical malpractice lawyer in your state, who may investigate your psychiatry malpractice claim for you and represent you or your family member in a medical malpractice case, if appropriate.

Visit our website or call us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959 to find medical negligence attorneys in your state who may assist you.

Turn to us when you don’t know where to turn.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, October 25th, 2017 at 5:23 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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