Former Nursing Home Employee Convicted Of Raping 85-Year-Old Resident Has Been Re-Sentenced As Sexual Predator

A 56-year-old man who worked in an Ohio nursing home was convicted of raping an 85-year-old resident in 2000. The victim was reportedly one of three nursing home residents that he told his girlfriend that he had raped while he was working at the nursing home. Investigators have been unable to identify the other two alleged victims.

The sexual predator was originally sentenced in June 2019 to a prison sentence of six years after pleading guilty to two counts of raping the bed-ridden, non-verbal elderly nursing home resident in 2000. The man was reported to a law enforcement tipline by his girlfriend.

On September 6, 2019, the man was re-sentenced under a new sex offender law. A forensic psychologist who testified during the re-sentencing hearing stated that the man had told her that he had previously worked for nine years as a Sheriff’s deputy but was fired after he lost his gun while drinking with his partner. He then attended nursing school after which he was employed in a hospital’s trauma unit and orthopedics unit, where he allegedly made inappropriate sexual remarks.

During the re-sentencing hearing, the forensic psychologist and a detective were also questioned about the girlfriend’s allegations that the man had solicited sexual favors during traffic stops when he worked as a deputy sheriff. The forensic psychologist testified during the re-sentencing hearing, “This is pretty much the classic profile of a sex offender … [the man poses a] high risk of criminally re-offending and probably sexually re-offending as well.” The man’s criminal history reportedly includes two charges for drunk driving and a charge of domestic violence that was reduced to disorderly conduct.

Once the man is released from prison, he will be required to registered as a sexual predator for the remainder of his lifetime.

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Must A Nursing Home Tell Residents If Another Resident Is A Sex Offender?

The New York Post reported on June 7, 2019 that “New York state law does not require nursing homes to tell elderly or recuperating residents whether a convicted sex offender is bunking down in the next room … The State Health Department confirmed that nursing homes in New York are not required by law to notify residents or their families that a sex offender lived nearby.”

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If you or a loved one suffered injuries (or worse) while a resident of a nursing home in the United States due to nursing home neglect, nursing home negligence, nursing home abuse, nursing home understaffing, nursing home resident-on-resident attack, nursing home sexual abuse, or the nursing home failing to properly care for a vulnerable adult, you should promptly find a nursing home claim lawyer in your state who may investigate your nursing home claim for you and file a nursing home claim on your behalf or behalf of your loved one, if appropriate.

Click here to visit our website to be connected with medical malpractice attorneys (nursing home claim attorneys) in your U.S. state who may assist you with your nursing home claim, or call us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959.

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This entry was posted on Thursday, September 26th, 2019 at 5:23 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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