Ohio Cognitive Center’s Director Misrepresented Her Qualifications, According To Lawsuits

162017_132140396847214_292624_nIn four lawsuits recently filed against an Ohio cognitive center, the plaintiffs allege that the center’s director fraudulently misrepresented to them that she was a neuropsychologist at the time the director diagnosed the patients with Alzheimer’s disease, which subsequent second opinions by physicians determined to be an incorrect diagnosis.

The four Ohio plaintiffs allege in their fraud cases that the center’s director misled them into believing that she was a qualified neuropsychologist when she misdiagnosed each of them as suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The plaintiffs allege in their medical malpractice lawsuits filed against the center and others that the center’s director was not a neuropsychologist, that she did not hold a medical license or a license to practice psychology in Ohio, and that she was unqualified to make a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

The plaintiffs name not only the Ohio cognitive center and its director as defendants, but also names the director’s husband, who is a medical doctor, as a defendant. The plaintiffs’ lawsuits allege psychology malpractice, medical malpractice, the unauthorized practice of medicine, the unauthorized practice of psychology, and fraud and misrepresentation.

The plaintiffs further allege that the center’s bills for services rendered to the plaintiffs listed the center director’s husband as the referring physician, even though none of the plaintiffs had ever met or had ever been treated by the husband. The patients and their health insurance companies reportedly were issued refunds after the plaintiffs’ allegations were made.

The plaintiffs each seek compensatory damages in excess of $75,000 and punitive damages in excess of $1 million.

Source

At the time the cognitive center opened, the director represented that she is “a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the Academy of Neuroscience, the Academy of Cognitive Function, the Institute of Neuroscience, the Brain Research Institute, the Academy of Self-Reported Cognitive Impairment and Cognitive and Brain Function. She earned her doctorate in neuroscience, cognition and hearing from the University of California, Los Angeles.”

The director stated at that time that “she performs comprehensive neuro-cognitive testing; orders blood tests to identify cognitive markers, PET scans and hearing screenings to identify the indicative cause for memory loss. I use a holistic manner with a scientific approach for my patients. I use neuro-cognitive testing coupled with PET /CT scans to confirm my diagnosis. This also allows me to see what part of the brain is functioning well and helps me to design a protocol for each patient.”

Source

If you or a loved one may have suffered injuries or other harms as a result of the professional negligence of a psychologist in Ohio or in another U.S. state, you may be entitled to compensation for your losses. It is important that you promptly seek the advice of a local medical malpractice attorney to investigate your possible psychologist malpractice claim for you in order to determine if filing a psychology malpractice claim is appropriate.

Click here to visit our website or telephone us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959 to be connected with medical malpractice lawyers in your state who may be willing to assist you with a possible psychologist malpractice claim.

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This entry was posted on Monday, August 29th, 2016 at 5:15 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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