Uterine Cancer Rates, Deaths Increase In U.S.

The CDC reported on December 7, 2018 that “Uterine cancer is one of the few cancers with increasing incidence and mortality in the United States, reflecting, in part, increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity since the 1980s. It is the fourth most common cancer diagnosed and the seventh most common cause of cancer death among U.S. women.”

The CDC reported: “the rate of new uterine cancer cases increased during 1999–2015, with larger increases observed among black, AI/AN [non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native], API [non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander], and Hispanic women than among white women. This contrasts with the recent decreases in incidence rates that have been observed for many cancer types, such as lung and colorectal cancers. One contributing factor to increasing uterine cancer incidence could be excess body weight; women who are overweight (body mass index [BMI] = 25.0–29.9 kg/m2) or have obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) are approximately two to four times as likely to develop endometrial cancer as are women with healthy weight. During 2013–2016, approximately 40% of women in the United States had obesity, including 56% of black women and 49% of Hispanic women.”

The CDC reported: “uterine cancer death rates were higher in 2016 than in 1999 and that black women were approximately twice as likely to die from uterine cancer as were women in other racial/ethnic groups. As with other cancers, the odds of surviving uterine cancer are much higher when it is detected at an early stage, when treatment is more effective. The 5-year relative survival estimate for localized uterine cancer is 80%–90% compared with <30% for distant uterine cancer ... black women were more likely to receive a diagnosis at distant stage and with more aggressive histologic types than were other women, which might in part account for the higher death rate among black women." During 1999–2015, uterine cancer incidence rates increased 12%, about 0.7% per year on average, with larger increases observed among AI/AN (53%; AAPC = 2.7%), black (46%; 2.4%), API (38%; 2.0%), and Hispanic (32%; 1.8%) women than among white women (9%; 0.5%). During 1999–2015, incidence rates of endometrioid carcinomas increased 4.5% per year, other carcinomas decreased 4.5% per year, carcinosarcomas increased 1.9% per year, and sarcoma incidence remained stable. In 2015, a total of 53,911 new uterine cancer cases, corresponding to 27 cases per 100,000 women, were reported in the United States. Uterine cancer incidence rates increased 0.7% per year during 1999–2015, and death rates increased 1.1% per year during 1999–2016, with smaller increases observed among non-Hispanic white (white) women than among women in other racial/ethnic groups. In 2016, 10,733 uterine cancer deaths, corresponding to five deaths per 100,000 women, were reported in the United States. Uterine cancer death rates among black women (nine deaths per 100,000) were higher than those among white (five), AI/AN (four), API (four), and Hispanic (four) women. The CDC reported that public health efforts to help women achieve and maintain a healthy weight and obtain sufficient physical activity can reduce the risk for developing cancer of the endometrium (the lining of the uterus): endometrioid carcinomas were the most common uterine cancers (68%). Abnormal vaginal bleeding, including bleeding between periods or after sex or any unexpected bleeding after menopause, is an important symptom of uterine cancer. Source

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 2nd, 2019 at 5:23 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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