Maryland Has Highest Hospitalization Rate For Opioid Use

162017_132140396847214_292624_nBetween 2005 and 2014, the rate of opioid-related inpatient hospital stays in the United States increased 64.1%, from 136.8 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 224.6 per 100,000 population in 2014, representing a 5.7% average annual growth rate. During the same period, the rate of opioid-related ED visits in the United States increased 99.4%, from 89.1 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 177.7 per 100,000 population in 2014, representing an 8.0% average annual growth rate.

Opioid Deaths In The United States

Between 2000 and 2014, the rate of overdose deaths involving opioids in the United States increased 200%. Between 2013 and 2014, the rate of opioid overdose deaths increased 14%, from 7.9 to 9.0 per 100,000 population. Hospitalizations related to opioid misuse and dependence also have increased dramatically, with the rate of adult hospital inpatient stays per 100,000 population nearly doubling between 2000 and 2012.

Maryland Is The Inauspicious Leader

In 2014, the highest rate of opioid-related inpatient stays was in Maryland (362.1 stays per 100,000 population), which was more than 8 times higher than the lowest rate in Iowa (44.2). Following Maryland, the next highest rates of opioid-related inpatient stays were in the District of Columbia (339.0), New York (335.3), Rhode Island (332.5), and Massachusetts (318.6).

The next lowest rates of opioid-related inpatient stays above Iowa were in Nebraska (46.1), Texas (70.9), Kansas (73.4), and Wyoming (77.8).

Rates Of Opioid-Related Hospital Inpatient Stays Between 2009 And 2014

Thirty-seven of 42 U.S. states had an increase of at least 10% in the population-based rate of opioid-related hospital inpatient stays between 2009 and 2014, with the largest increases in Oregon (88.9% increase), North Carolina (81.8% increase), and South Dakota (74.1% increase).

Four U.S. states had a relatively stable rate of opioid-related hospital inpatient stays, with a 6-year change in rate (increase or decrease) of less than 10%: New York, Louisiana, Illinois, and Maryland (-9.2%). Nonetheless, New York, Illinois, and Maryland were among the top 10 U.S. states in rate of opioid-related hospital inpatient stays in 2014.

Kansas showed the largest decrease in the rate of opioid-related hospital inpatient stays (10.3%), and in 2014, Kansas was among the U.S. states with the lowest rate of opioid-related hospital inpatient stays (73.4 stays per 100,000 population). Maryland had the second largest decrease in the rate of opioid-related hospital inpatient stays in 2014.

Rates Of Opioid-Related ED Visits In 2014

In 2014, the highest rate of opioid-related ED visits was in Massachusetts (441.6 visits per 100,000 population), which was more than 14 times higher than the lowest rate in Iowa (31.1). Following Massachusetts, the next highest rates of opioid-related ED visits were in Rhode Island (288.6), Maryland (288.4), Ohio (276.5), and Connecticut (243.0).

The next lowest rates above Iowa were in Nebraska (39.9), South Dakota (47.1), Arkansas (62.3), and Kansas (69.0).

U. S. states with the highest opioid-related rate for hospital inpatient stays also tended to have the highest opioid-related rate for ED visits: there was a strong, positive correlation (0.84) between opioid-related population rates for inpatient stays and ED visits. For example, Maryland had the third-highest rate of opioid-related ED visits in 2014: 288.4 visits per 100,000 population.

Almost All U.S. States Had An Increase In The Rate Of Opioid-Related ED Visits Between 2009 And 2014

Almost all U.S. states (26 of 27 States) had an increase of at least 10% in the population rate of opioid-related ED visits between 2009 and 2014, with the highest rate increases in Ohio (119.1% increase), South Dakota (106.4% increase), and Minnesota (102.3% increase).

Only one state, Iowa, showed a substantial decrease in the rate of opioid-related ED visits (18.5% decrease). Iowa also had the lowest rate of opioid-related ED visits (31.1 visits per 100,000 population).

Source

If you or a loved one were injured (or worse) due to an opioid, you should promptly find a drug claim attorney in your U.S. state who may investigate your drug claim for you and represent you in a drug claim case and/or a medication malpractice case, if appropriate.

Visit our website to be connected with drug claim lawyers in your state who may assist you, or call us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959.

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This entry was posted on Monday, January 16th, 2017 at 5:19 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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