Lap Band And Gastric Bypass Weight Loss Surgeries: Are They Effective In The Long Term?

We have been receiving an increase in the number of inquiries with regard to unsuccessful lap band and unsuccessful gastric bypass surgeries in which the patients were either unexpectedly injured during the procedures or they suffered harm after the surgeries due to unanticipated complications or the failure to provide appropriate follow-up care. That led us to wonder if gastric bypass surgery and lap band surgeries help patients maintain weight loss and other promised benefits from the procedures in the long term. A recently published study provides some of the answers.

The results of a study entitled “Seven-Year Weight Trajectories and Health Outcomes in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) Study” that was published online in the medical journal JAMA Surgery on December 6, 2017 analyzed long-term weight change and health status following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (“RYGB”) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (“LAGB”).

The study looked at data from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study (“LABS”) that involved ten hospitals in six geographically diverse clinical settings in the United States. The LABS participants had undergone bariatric procedures between 2006 and 2009, and they were followed until January 31, 2015 (the participants completed research assessments during the pre-surgery period, at 6 months following surgery, and annually thereafter, for up to seven years). Of the 2,348 participants, 74% (1,738) had RYGB and 26% (610) had LAGB.

For the RYGB participants, the mean weight loss at seven years was 28.4% (38.2 kg) of baseline weight. The mean weight gain between years three and seven was 3.9% of baseline weight for RYGB participants.

For the LAGB participants, the mean weight loss at seven years was 14.9% (18.8 kg) of baseline weight. The mean weight gain between years three and seven was 1.4% of baseline weight for LAGB participants.

The study found that participants with dyslipidemia (an elevation of triglycerides, plasma cholesterol, or both, or a low level of high-density lipoprotein that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis) was lower over seven years, compared to baseline, with both RYGB and LAGB.

For participants who had diabetes at the time of their procedures: for those who had RYGB procedures, the percentage who were in remission at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 71.2%, 69.4%, 64.6%, and 60.2%, respectively; for those who had LAGB procedures, the percentage who were in remission at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 30.7%, 29.3%, 29.2%, and 20.3%, respectively. The study found that the incidence of diabetes was less than 1.5% at all follow-up assessments for RYGB.

The study found that bariatric re-operations occurred in 14 RYGB participants and in 160 LAGB participants.

The study concluded: “Following bariatric surgery, different weight loss patterns were observed, but most participants maintained much of their weight loss with variable fluctuations over the long term. There was some decline in diabetes remission over time, but the incidence of new cases is low following RYGB.”

If you or a family member suffered serious harm during or after bariatric surgery in the United States, you should find a medical malpractice lawyer in your U.S. state who may investigate your bariatric surgery malpractice claim for you and represent you in a bariatric malpractice case, if appropriate.

Click here to visit our website or call us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959 to be connected with medical malpractice attorneys in your state who may assist you.

Turn to us when you don’t know where to turn.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, December 19th, 2017 at 5:20 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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