Best (And Worst) U.S. States For Physicians In 2016

162017_132140396847214_292624_nA recent analysis ranks the 50 U. S. states and the District of Columbia with regard to their working environments for physicians. Although the analysis was not undertaken by a well-known research group and is not peer reviewed, it does shed light on which U.S. states are the best, and which are the worst, for physicians based on eleven metrics.

The Eleven Metrics

The eleven metrics were: the mean annual wage for physicians, adjusted for cost of living (this metric was given twice the weight of the other seven metrics used to analyze opportunity and competition among physicians); the monthly average starting salary of physicians, adjusted for cost of living; the number of hospitals per 100,000 residents; the insured population rate; medically underserved areas or populations; the projected percentage of the population aged 65 and older by 2030; the number of physicians per 1,000 residents; the projected percentage of physicians per 1,000 residents by 2022; the number of serious disciplinary actions by state medical boards per 1,000 physicians; medical malpractice award payouts per capita; and, the medical malpractice liability insurance rate.

The Overall State Rankings

The overall rankings for the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia are as follows, in descending order: Mississippi, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, Idaho, Texas, Kansas, Wisconsin, Tennessee, Alabama, South Carolina, South Dakota, Georgia, Montana, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, Nebraska, Louisiana, California, Virginia, Indiana, Nevada, Kentucky, Missouri, Michigan, Washington State, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Arizona, Pennsylvania, Utah, Illinois, Hawaii, West Virginia, New Hampshire, Oregon, Alaska, Maine, Delaware, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Jersey, Connecticut, Maryland, Rhode Island, New York, and the District of Columbia.

The U.S. states with the highest medical malpractice payouts per capita were Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

The U.S. states with the lowest medical malpractice payouts per capita were North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Texas, and North Carolina.

The U.S. states predicted to have the most physicians per capita in 2022 are Missouri, New York, the District of Columbia, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

The U.S. states predicted to have the fewest physicians per capita in 2022 are Mississippi, Idaho, Alaska, Hawaii, and Nevada.

The U.S. states with the most number of serious disciplinary actions by state medical boards per 1,000 physicians are New Mexico, Delaware, Ohio, Louisiana, and Wyoming.

The U.S. states with the least number of serious disciplinary actions by state medical boards per 1,000 physicians are South Carolina, the District of Columbia, Minnesota, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

Source

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, April 6th, 2016 at 5:26 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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