Brain Cancer Replaces Leukemia As Leading Cause Of Cancer Deaths Among U.S. Children

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its Data Brief for September 2016 in which it reiterated the good news that since the mid-1970s, cancer death rates among children and adolescents in the United States showed marked declines, but also noted the bad news that there has been a slow increase in incidence for some of the major types of cancer among children and adolescents.

The NCHS’s major findings are:

During 1999–2014, the cancer death rate for children and adolescents aged 1–19 years in the United States declined 20%, from 2.85 to 2.28 per 100,000 population;

Cancer death rates declined for both females and males during the 1999–2014 period but the cancer death rate for males aged 1–19 years in 2014 was 30% higher than for females (the cancer death rates in 1999–2014 for male children and adolescents aged 1–19 years were continually higher than for their female counterparts);

The cancer death rate for females in 2014 (1.98) was 22% lower than the 1999 rate (2.54), while the rate for males in 2014 (2.57) was 18% lower than the 1999 rate (3.15);

Declines in cancer death rates during 1999–2014 were experienced among both white and black persons aged 1–19 years and for all 5-year age groups; and,

During 1999–2014, brain cancer replaced leukemia as the most common cancer causing death among children and adolescents aged 1–19 years, accounting for 3 out of 10 cancer deaths in 2014.

The NCHS also found:

In both 1999 and 2014, more than one-half of all cancer deaths among children and adolescents aged 1–19 years were attributable to either leukemia or brain cancer (combined, they accounted for 53.4% of all cancer deaths to persons aged 1–19 years in 1999 and 54.8% in 2014);

Three out of 10 cancer deaths among children and adolescents aged 1–19 years in 1999 were due to leukemia (29.7%), the most common site, whereas about one in four were due to brain cancer (23.7%). By 2014, these percentages reversed and brain cancer was the most common site, accounting for 29.9% of total cancer deaths;

Other common sites of cancer causing deaths among children and adolescents aged 1–19 years were: bone and articular cartilage (10.1% in 2014), thyroid and other endocrine glands (9.0%), and mesothelial and soft tissue (7.7%). These cancers, along with brain cancer and leukemia, accounted for more than 8 out of 10 (81.6%) cancer deaths among children and adolescents in 2014; and,

Although accounting for a small percentage of all cancer deaths among children and adolescents aged 1–19 years, deaths due to cancer of the kidney and renal pelvis declined from 2.8% in 1999 to 1.8% in 2014.

The NCHS stated that major therapeutic advances in treating some forms of cancer, particularly leukemia, may have resulted in increased survivorship and contributed to the decline in cancer mortality among children and adolescents aged 1–19 years during 1999–2014.

Source

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This entry was posted on Saturday, September 24th, 2016 at 5:19 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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