West Virginia Suspends License Of Pain Management Doctor

162017_132140396847214_292624_nAn osteopathic doctor who was the sole doctor at a pain management clinic in West Virginia has had his medical license suspended after a finding that the pain management clinic reused syringes on more than one patient and that the doctor failed to wear a surgical mask when he performed epidural injections. The investigation also found other hygiene and sanitation issues that affected patient safety. One former patient of the pain management clinic contracted bacterial meningitis that was diagnosed in October 2013.

Reusing syringes on more than one patient is a big no-no: reusing syringes on multiple patients exposes them to a whole list of communicable blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV. It is inexcusable and dangerous to reuse syringes on different patients.

On July 21, 2014, health officials in both West Virginia and Ohio warned all patients who had received injections at the West Virginia pain management clinic between the date it first opened in 2010 and November 1, 2013 that they should be tested for infections that can be spread by blood.

The doctor is no stranger to controversy: it has been reported that the doctor had his Texas medical license revoked in 2004 for violations in the standard of care in treating three of his patients, including a 61-year-old man who died in 1996 from allegedly unnecessary surgery. The doctor appealed the revocation of his medical license in Texas, which a Texas court later affirmed.

Despite its knowledge of the disciplinary action against the doctor’s Texas medical license, the West Virginia Board of Osteopathic Medicine granted the doctor a restricted West Virginia medical license in 2004 in order for the doctor to complete a neurosurgery refresher course in West Virginia. Then, in 2005, the West Virginia Board of Osteopathic Medicine granted the doctor an unrestricted medical license.

Source

The West Virginia Board of Osteopathic Medicine’s website states, “The West Virginia Board of Osteopathic Medicine handles the oversight of legal issuances of licenses to practice osteopathic medicine as physicians and physician’s assistants in the state of West Virginia. The Board also investigates all complaints and acquires any disciplinary action necessary to protect the citizens of West Virginia.” Source

We would welcome an independent, thorough, and honest investigation and review of the West Virginia Board of Osteopathic Medicine’s granting of a West Virginia restricted medical license to the doctor in 2004 and its awarding an unrestricted medical license to the doctor in 2005, especially in light of the Board taking over one year to consider and then approve the doctor’s original licensure application whereas the typical time it takes the Board to review such a license application is three to four weeks.

If you or a loved one suffered serious injuries (or worse) due to medical negligence in West Virginia or in another U.S. state, you should promptly consult with a West Virginia medical malpractice attorney (or a medical malpractice attorney in your state) who may investigate your medical malpractice claim for you and represent you in a medical malpractice case, if appropriate.

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This entry was posted on Saturday, August 2nd, 2014 at 8:25 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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