Recent Statistics For Health Insurance Coverage In The U.S.

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) has released its estimates regarding health insurance coverage statistics for people in the United States for January through September, 2010.

49.5 million people of all ages in the U.S., representing 16.3% of the population, had no health insurance coverage at the time they were interviewed (43.0 million (22.6%) for people ages 18 to 64 and 6.1 million (8.2%) for children under 18).  60.8 million (20.0%) had been uninsured for at least part of the prior year (adults ages 18 to 64 were more than twice as likely as children to be uninsured) and 36.1 million (11.9%) had been uninsured for more than one year.

59.1% of unemployed adults ages 18 to 64 were uninsured for at least part of the prior year (23.5% of employed adults ages 18 to 64 had been uninsured for at least part of the year). 36.4% of unemployed adults ages 18 to 64 and 15.0% of employed adults ages 18 to 64 had been uninsured for more than one year.

21.4% of people under 65 were insured under public plans (39.1% of children and 14.5% of adults ages 18 to 64 were covered under a public plan).

61.4% of people under 65 were covered by private health insurance (54.1% of children and 64.3% of adults ages 18 to 64 were covered under a private plan).

10.9% of poor children and 13.0% of near poor children did not have health insurance coverage. 43.7% of poor and 43.9% of near poor adults ages 18 to 64 did not have health insurance coverage.

81.0% of poor children and 58.4% of near poor children were covered by a public health plan (38.9% of poor adults ages 18 to 64 were covered by a public health plan).

9.7% of poor children and 31.0% of near poor children were covered by private health insurance (34.6% of near poor adults ages 18 to 64 were covered by private health insurance).

Hispanics were more likely to be uninsured (more than one-quarter of Hispanics were uninsured and more than one-third had been uninsured for at least part of the past year).

Men were more likely than women to lack health insurance and the highest rate of uninsured were for those ages 18 to 24 (the lowest rate was for children under 18).

Health insurance coverage was lowest in the South and the Western regions in the United States. The uninsured rates for people who lacked a high school diploma were two to more than three times higher than for those who had more than a high school diploma. Married or widowed adults over age 18 were more likely to have health insurance coverage than those who were divorced, separated, living with a partner, or never married.

What do the numbers mean? About one in six Americans did not have public or private health insurance coverage in the United States during the first nine months of 2010. The poor, the unemployed, men, and the less educated are more likely to be without health insurance coverage in the United States.

Whether you have health insurance coverage or not, you are entitled to the same quality of medical care as everyone else. If you or a loved one have been injured as a result of medical malpractice, visit our website to find medical malpractice lawyers in your area to help you with your claim or call us toll free 800-295-3959.

This entry was posted on Monday, May 2nd, 2011 at 10:43 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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