Patient Dumping Settlements In 2011

The Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (“OIG”) has reported the following settlements  involving patient dumping cases in 2011 that resulted in the payment of a civil monetary penalty (the settling parties denied the patient dumping allegations in each case):

December 22, 2011:

Princeton Baptist Medical Center (PBMC), Alabama, agreed to pay $170,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that PBMC failed to provide care, within its capabilities, to four individuals who were suffering from emergency medical conditions. Three of the individuals presented to PBMC’s emergency department with intracranial hemorrhages and one of the individuals presented with multiple fractures of the spinal column.

December 20, 2011:

Matthew Pearson, M.D., Tennessee, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Dr. Pearson, while on call at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Vanderbilt), refused to accept an appropriate transfer of an individual with an unstable emergency medical condition who required the specialized capabilities that were available at Vanderbilt. The patient was transferred to another facility and died shortly thereafter.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Vanderbilt), Tennessee, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Vanderbilt refused to accept an appropriate transfer of an individual with an unstable emergency medical condition who required the specialized capabilities that were available at Vanderbilt. The patient was transferred to another facility and died shortly thereafter.

November 15, 2011:

Schoolcraft Memorial Hospital (SMH), Michigan, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that SMH failed to provide stabilizing treatment to a 15-year-old male who came to SMH’s emergency department (ED) for examination and treatment of psychiatric and medical emergencies. The patient presented to SMH’s ED after a suicide attempt. The medical screening examination revealed that the patient was suffering from hypotension and abnormal heart rhythm. SMH provided the patient with a psychological assessment and intravenous fluids but did not provide further medical treatment needed to stabilize the patient’s medical condition. SMH transferred the patient to a psychiatric facility 169 miles away without stabilizing the patient’s vital signs. Forty minutes into the transfer, the patient began experiencing hypotensive episodes.

October 4, 2011:

Piedmont Hospital (Piedmont), Georgia, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Piedmont failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented with an emergency medical condition. Specifically, the patient presented to Piedmont after being diagnosed with a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) by her private physician. The patient made repeated requests for treatment for eight hours without success. The patient left Piedmont and presented to another hospital where she was diagnosed and treated for a pulmonary embolus in addition to the DVT.

Octobeer 3, 2011:

Springhill Medical Center (SMC), Alabama, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that SMC failed to accept an appropriate transfer of a patient with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient was accepted by another hospital approximately 100 miles away and expired the next day.

August 31, 2011:

Beatrice Community Hospital and Health Center (Beatrice), Nebraska, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Beatrice failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to two patients that presented with emergency medical conditions. Specifically, a patient presented to Beatrice complaining of discomfort after removing a feeding tube. The patient was not appropriately screened or stabilized before discharge. Another patient presented complaining of a loss of consciousness and difficulty moving his extremities after falling and hitting his head. The patient was not appropriately screened or stabilized before discharge. The patient later received treatment at another hospital but died as a result of his injury.

August 29, 2011:

Jewish Hospital & St. Mary’s HealthCare (Jewish Hospital), Kentucky, agreed to pay $42,500 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Jewish Hospital failed to provide a medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to two of its emergency departments (ED). The patient was suffering from a wrist laceration with arterial bleeding. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) transported the patient to two of Jewish Hospital’s ED’s that are located on the same property. Both ED’s instructed the EMS to transport the patient to another hospital.

August 17, 2011:

Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (Santa Clara), California, agreed to pay $48,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Santa Clara failed to provide a medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to its emergency department (ED) after receiving a referral from a nearby urgent care facility which diagnosed him with severe abnormal hemoglobin results. It was suspected that the patient had some sort of internal bleeding. Upon arrival to Santa Clara’s ED, the patient showed a nurse the referral papers and complained of dizziness, blurred vision, and fatigue. The patient was categorized as non-emergent and waited in the waiting room for seven hours. The patient expired in the ED.

July 8, 2011:

Dallas County Hospital District d/b/a Parkland Health and Hospital System (Parkland), California, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Parkland failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient that presented with an emergency medical condition. Specifically, Parkland failed to provide a physician ordered EKG or intravenous monitoring to a 58-year old cardiac diabetic patient. The patient expired of a heart attack.

Source

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This entry was posted on Saturday, March 10th, 2012 at 1:40 pm. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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