Examples Of New York Physician Misconduct Other Than Medical Malpractice

Physicians (medical doctors and doctors of osteopathy) may be disciplined by their respective state disciplinary boards for their actions that may be criminal in nature or otherwise not strictly based on “medical malpractice.”

In a recent matter before the New York State Board for Professional Medical Conduct, the Board found that a New York doctor who had held a New York medical license since 2002 had pleaded guilty to a felony involving the attempted dissemination of indecent material to a minor. The evidence showed that the doctor engaged in an on-line Internet conversation with a person he thought was a 14 year-old girl to whom he sent pornographic material and attempted to meet for the purposes of engaging in sex. The New York State Supreme Court sentenced the doctor to five years probation plus various monetary fines, fees, and charges for the criminal conviction. The medical board initially planned to punish the doctor by placing him under probation for a period of five years and permanently restricting the doctor to caring for patients who were over the age of 18. (A Review Board very recently overturned the penalty of probation and imposed revocation of the doctor’s New York medical license.) Source

In another recent (October, 2011) New York case, a New York doctor who had been licensed to practice medicine in New York since 1988 voluntarily surrendered his New York medical license after his Connecticut medical license was summarily suspended by the Connecticut Board based on allegations that the doctor had engaged in inappropriate physical contact with a patient and made inappropriate comments to a patient. Source

The New York medical board censured, reprimanded, and fined a medical doctor who had held a New York medical license since 1987 for answering “no” in 2004 to a medical license renewal application question inquiring if he had been found guilty or had pled no contest to a crime since his last renewal when earlier that year he had entered a plea of no contest to a criminal charge in Nebraska for driving under the influence of alcohol. Source

In our last example of a recent New York disciplinary case involving a physician whose alleged misconduct was not based on medical malpractice but nonetheless affected the status of his medical license concerned a New York medical doctor who had been licensed to practice medicine in New York since 1990. The doctor had been excluded from participation in the Medicaid program for a period of five years because of alleged Medicaid fraud (the doctor reportedly had been found to have billed Medicaid for services that he did not render and created false entries in his charts to conceal that fact). The medical board initially recommended that the doctor’s New York medical license be revoked but a review board subsequently recommended that the doctor be placed on probation for a period of five years. Source

If you have been the victim of medical malpractice or some other wrongdoing by a doctor or other medical provider that caused you to suffer injury or other serious harm, you may be entitled to compensation for your losses. Visit our website to be connected with medical malpractice lawyers in your state who may be able to assist you with a medical malpractice claim or other claim against a doctor or other medical provider whose wrongful actions caused you to be seriously injured or to sustain some other serious harm. You may also reach us toll free at 800-295-3959.

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011 at 10:23 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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