CDC’s Report On Hospital-Acquired Infections

162017_132140396847214_292624_nEarlier this month, the CDC issued its report entitled National And State Healthcare Associated Infections Progress Report (“Report”) that analyzes the CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (“NHSN”) data from more than 13,000 hospitals and other healthcare facilities. The Report includes national and state-by-state summaries of six hospital-acquired infections (“HAIs”) based on 2013 data.

The data in the Report are from acute care hospitals only and involve the following six Hospital-Acquired Infections: central line-associated bloodstream infections (“CLABSI”), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (“CAUTI”), surgical site infections (“SSI”) (state-specific SSI data are presented for colon surgery and abdominal hysterectomy surgery),  hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infections (“C.difficile”), and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (“MRSA”) bacteremia, which are bloodstream infections.

An important underlying statistic: every day in the U.S., one in 25 hospital patients has at least one of the six hospital-aquired infections, contracted during his/her course of hospital care.

The January 2015 CDC Report found significant reductions reported at the national level for nearly all infections in 2013 but did not reach the 2013 goals established by the HAI Action Plan in 2009. CLABSI and SSI showed the greatest reduction; some progress was shown in reducing both hospital-onset MRSA bacteremia and hospital-onset C.difficile infections; but there was an increase in CAUTI (similar to last year’s report), “signaling a strong need for additional prevention efforts.”

The Report found the following on the national level:

 – 46 percent decrease in CLABSI between 2008 and 2013;

– 19 percent decrease in SSI related to the 10 select procedures tracked in the report between 2008 and 2013;

– 6 percent increase in CAUTI between 2009 and 2013;

– 8 percent decrease in MRSA bacteremia between 2011 and 2013; and,

– 10 percent decrease in C.difficile infections between 2011 and 2013.

The Report found the following on the state level:

– 26 states performed better than the national SIR (standardized infection ratio) on at least two infection types;

– 16 states performed better than the national SIR on at least three infection types;

– 6 states performed better than the national SIR on at least four infection types;

– 19 states performed worse than the national SIR on at least two infection types; and,

– 8 states performed worse than the national SIR on at least three infection types.

Comparing the number of states performing better than the nation by infection type, the Report found:

– CLABSI – 16 states;

– SSI, colon surgery – 9 states;

– SSI, abdominal hysterectomy – 8 states;

– CAUTI – 19 states;

– MRSA bacteremia – 19 states; and,

– C.difficile infections – 21 states.

Comparing the number of states performing worse than the nation by infection type, the Report found:

– CLABSI – 14 states;

– SSI, colon surgery – 13 states;

– SSI, abdominal hysterectomy – 3 states;

– CAUTI – 17 states;

– MRSA bacteremia – 12 states; and,

– C.difficile infections – 18 states.

The Report cites research that had found that when healthcare facilities, care teams, and individual doctors and nurses are aware of infection problems and take specific steps to prevent them, rates of some targeted HAIs can decrease by more than 70 percent.

You can read the entire Report by clicking here.

If you suffered as a result of a hospital-acquired infection in the United States, you may be entitled to receive compensation for your injuries and losses if the infection was due to medical negligence, and/or if you suffered as a result of negligent treatment of your infection.

Visit our website or call us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959 to find a medical malpractice lawyer in your state who may investigate your hospital infection claim for you and represent you in a claim against a hospital, if appropriate.

Turn to us when you don’t know where to turn.

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This entry was posted on Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 at 5:53 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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